Health Benefits of Hemp Seed Oil

/Health Benefits of Hemp Seed Oil
Health Benefits of Hemp Seed Oil2018-02-19T23:39:10+00:00

Health Benefits of Hemp Seed Oil



Hemp seed oil has been used for its health benefits for thousands of years.

Now modern medical and nutritional scientists have started to rediscover hemp seed oil’s many beneficial properties.


To comply with MPI guidelines, please note that any mention of oral consumption of hemp seed oil refers exclusively to hemp seed oil inside of capsules. Hemp seed oil in a bottle is a topical treatment only. We do not claim that oil in a bottle has any health benefits when taken orally. Only hemp seed oil in a capsule has the potential health benefits discussed in this article.


The Health Benefits Of Hemp Seed Oil1000mg Hemp Seed Oil Capsules 2018

The numbered references to scientific studies are clickable, and can also be found at the bottom of the page.

Hemp seed oil contains omega fatty acids [25] [26] [27]
Omega fatty acids like those in hemp seed oil have been shown to:
Lower blood pressure [1] [2]
Lower cholesterol [3] [4] [5]
Ease arthritis [6] [7] [8] [9]
Help treat ADHD [10] [11]
Improve immunity [12] [13]
Reduce inflammation [14] [15] [16]
Improve mood [17] [18] [19]
Improve organ function [20]
Improve metabolism [21]
Improve cardiovascular health [22] [23]
Improve post-exercise recovery [24]
Improve carpal tunnel syndrome [50]

Like fish oil, only better!

In recent years it has become public knowledge that fish oil can improve health in many ways, with even doctors recommending it to their patients. Fish are not magic, it’s the fatty acids contained within them that heal the body. It’s also well known that our oceans are being depleted and poisoned more and more each day. So is fish oil really a sustainable option for humanity? Hemp seed oil contains the same healthy omega fatty acids found in fish. The difference is that hemp seed oil is from a safe and sustainable source, and the fats are in a healthier ratio. This is key to why hemp seed is so special. Despite thousands of years of use, modern research into hemp is only just beginning. We must therefore also look to studies of other omega 3 oils to see the many benefits hemp seed oil holds.

hemp seed oil blood pressure

Blood Pressure

Dietary supplements of omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids reduce blood pressure in hypertensive patients, but it seems this effect does not appear in healthy individuals. In simple words, Hemp seed oil will not cause low blood pressure and faintness in people with normal values, but it will reduce it in hypertensive (high blood pressure) patients. This lowers the risk of cardiovascular diseases such as stroke and heart attack.

According to the research published in the Journal of Hypertension (official journal of European Society of Hypertension), omega-3 fatty acids are recommended to be used as an adjunct therapy combined with diuretics and beta blockers in order to achieve better blood pressure control [51].

Heart Disease & Hemp Seed Oil

A 2007 study found that hemp seed oil was able to prevent blood clots from forming. This could be a potential medicine for preventing clot-induced strokes and heart. Researcher in another study concluded that hemp seed oil may provide significant protection from strokes. Recent analysis conducted by the American Chemical Society found that intake of omega-3 fatty acids may prevent coronary heart disease prevention.

When it comes to hemp seed oil specifically, researchers have discovered that it is the plant sterols – special compounds found in plants known to lower cholesterol – that potentially prevent heart problems. Hemp seed oil also contains tocopherols, which reduce the risk of degenerative heart diseases, among a variety of other conditions.

hemp seed oil heart disease

Inflammation

Inflammation is a good thing- as long as it’s under control. That’s how the body fights off bacteria and other microorganisms and how it heals itself. But sometimes inflammation gets out of control and establishes as a permanent process, damaging the body functions and causing severe health issues in the long run. Medical research in the past decade revealed it’s the missing link between obesity and diabetes.

A study published in 2013 revealed that omega-3 fatty acids lower biomarkers of body inflammation and metabolic syndrome [52]. Although this finding may seem not so spectacular to laymen, what it tells us is that hemp seed oil can help you prevent diabetes, put the insulin resistance under control or interrupt the obesity- metabolic syndrome- diabetes cascade in time, before serious health complications occur.

Arthritis symptoms

Most clinical studies looking at omega-3 supplements for arthritis have focused on rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune disease that causes inflammation in the joints. Several small-scale studies found that supplementation reduced symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, including joint pain and stiffness. One study suggests that people with rheumatoid arthritis who take fish oil may be able to lower their dose of painkillers (NSAIDs).

An analysis of 17 randomized, controlled clinical trials looked at the pain-relieving effects of omega-3 fatty acid supplements in people with rheumatoid arthritis or joint pain caused by inflammatory bowel disease (IBS) and painful menstruation (dysmenorrhea). The results suggest that omega-3 fatty acids, along with conventional therapies, such as NSAIDs, may help relieve joint pain associated with these conditions.

hemp seed oil cholesterol

Lowering Blood Cholesterol

Omega 3 is well known for it’s effect on blood pressure, regularly given to patients by doctors on prescription. Increasing the amount of hemp seed oil in your diet may help cholesterol-lowering medications called statins work more effectively. These medications include:

  • Atorvastatin (Liptor)
  • Lovastatin (Mevacor)
  • Simvastatin (Zocor)

Management of hypertriglyceridemia

Hypertriglyceridemia, one of the most common metabolic disorders, is a condition of elevated triglycerides in the blood. It is essential to understand that omega-3 fatty acids have their place in therapy of different health conditions. These supplements are not always the best choice. For example, in cases of severe hypertriglyceridemia, it’s essential to put it under control as fast as possible, before acute pancreatitis develops (often deadly inflammation of the pancreas).

On the other hand, in patients with moderate elevation of triglycerides, omega-3 fatty acids (Hemp Seed Oil) can be used as an adjuvant or single therapy option [53]. Unlike statins, omega-3 FA does not have side or adverse effects, and no drug interactions have been recorded so far. Also, they do not affect liver function (unlike statins which show the hepatotoxic effect in some patients). Why is this important? In some cases, introducing another drug into the therapy of a patient who already regularly takes a few medications can trigger side effects or interact with some of the drugs, changing their “behavior” in the body (a phenomenon with the sometimes fatal outcome).

hemp seed oil pms

Pre-Menstrual Syndrome

Hemp seed oil is rich in GLA (gamma linolenic acid), a building block from some prostaglandins. Prostaglandins play an important role in the body’s function, helping smooth muscles contract, controlling body temperature and inflammation, and other bodily functions. This research suggests that supplementing with GLA is important for optimal hormone health, and may be why so many women with PMS have been helped by hemp seed oil. One study of women with PMS required the women take one gram of essential fatty acids (including 210 mg of GLA) daily. This resulted in a significant reduction in their PMS symptoms. Hemp seed oil’s high levels of GLA indicate that it may also help reduce menopause symptoms.

Conclusion

The past two decades brought omega-3 fatty acids into the focus of scientific research. All world known medical journals, published on monthly basis research results that push further the boundaries of our omega-3 fatty acids understanding. Two or three decades ago, it was unimaginable to hear a doctor say “use more omega-3 fatty acids in your diet to regulate your blood lipids level”. Today, it would be wrong not to try those before introducing drugs into the therapy. Keep in mind that omega-3 fatty acids are not the magical solution for every health problem- sometimes you will need drugs (especially in situations when it’s crucial to achieve therapeutic effect as fast as possible). Hemp Seed Oil is a natural source of omega-3 fatty acids and a great alternative to processed fats we consume so much nowadays.

Health Benefits Of Hemp Seed Oil

Why is hemp seed oil so healthy?

For detailed information, click here to read a PDF about hemp seed oil as a nutrition source.

The Perfect Balance

Hemp Seed Oil is nature’s most perfectly balanced plant oil because it has a very healthy 3:1 ratio of Omega 6 to Omega 3. [28]
In the modern diet, the ratio of Omega 6 to 3 can be as distorted as 20:1 (trans fats, and processed vegetable fats being to blame for this). Views vary, but most agree that the ratio should be between 5:1 and 3:1. [29]
Hemp seed oil is known to contain up to 5% of pure GLA, a much higher concentration than any other plant [30].  GLA has been shown to reduce inflammation in the body. [31] [32]

Understanding Fats and Essential Fatty Acids

A modern obsession has developed with fats. “Low-fat” has become part of the modern culture. But there are many misunderstandings about the different types of fats, their impact upon health and their role in therapeutic nutrition.
Essential Fatty Acids are an essential for health and vitality [33].  They cannot be made by your body, so they need to be included in your diet [34]. They are often referred to as the “Good Fats”. This special group of fats that deserve most attention when it comes to health and nutrition.
Essential fatty acids fall into two groups omega 3 and 6 (parent essential fatty acids), and your body uses them to make derivatives of these. [35]

“Bad fats”

Processed / synthetic fats are generally referred to as:

  • Hydrogenated fats

  • Partially Hydrogenated fats / shortening

  • Trans fats

  • Trans saturated fatty acids

These should be completely eliminated from your diet if you want to achieve optimum health and vitality [36]. Even those saying for example “virtually free from trans fats” should be left out of your shopping basket, checking labels is essential.
Hydrogenated fats have absolutely no nutritional benefit, and are in fact harmful [37]. Synthetic fats form new molecular structures unacceptable to the human physiology [38]. Evidence continues to grow about the health risks (although researchers began to document the risks back in the 70s).
The soaring rates of health conditions such as heart disease go hand in hand with the dramatic rise in processed vegetable oils and are nothing to do with the consumption of natural fats such as butter. We don’t have to go back very far to find evidence of diets extremely high in saturated fats, and yet a low incidence of heart disease. Even today, we can find groups of people with high fat diets, and still a low incidence of heart disease, obesity and other conditions often associated with saturated fats [39]. This is called the “French Paradox”.

“Good fats”

So let’s look at the natural fats

These fall into three main headings (sub headings will be looked at below):

  • Saturated

  • Monounsaturated

  • Polyunsaturated

Saturated Fats

Saturated fats are solid in form, when stored at room temperature. Subject to intense negative publicity, probably even more so than trans fats, saturated fats are much misunderstood. Lard and Butter for example are natural saturated fats, and in moderation are perfectly healthy [40].

Monounsaturated fats

These can be found in some healthy oils, and foods such as olives, almonds, pecans and avocados. Olive Oil is a key part of the Mediterranean diet known for its health benefits [41].

Polyunsaturated Fats

They are found in various vegetable oils, corn, sunflower, safflower, sesame and soy.
Most polyunsaturated fats are weighted far too heavily towards omega 6. While some are better than others, some should be avoided completely, especially when refined and processed [42].

Essential Fatty Acids

  • ALA – (alpha-linolenic acid) is a “short chain” fatty acid found in plant sources, such as hemp seed oil, flaxseed oil and walnuts. Unique to plants, even those who eat a lot of fish would be well advised to ensure adequate intake [43] [44].

  • EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) are “long chain” fatty acids found in fish, the best sources being salmon, sardines, mackerel, herring, halibut and sea bass [45].

The science is complex, however, in short, if you’re consuming good quantities of ALA (short chain), this converts to EPA and DHA in the body [46].

Omega-6 – Good and Bad!

Also known as Linoleic Acid, and is mainly found in plant oils. But also beef, chicken (especially non grass fed), grains and eggs [47]. Intake for many people is too high, as frying oils are mostly the “bad forms” of omega 6. However, “good omega 6”, such as GLA, is needed in the right quantities for health [29].
Eliminating processed foods, eating oily fish regularly, and consuming good oils such as Hemp Seed Oil with leafy greens [49] easily brings the balance of omega fatty acids in the body back into balance [48].
For more detailed information, click here to read a PDF about hemp seed oil as a nutrition source.

References

  1. Food Omega-3 Fatty Acid Intake of Individuals (Total, Linolenic Acid, Long-Chain) and Their Blood Pressure INTERMAP Study

  2. Reduction of blood pressure and plasma triglycerides by omega-3 fatty acids in treated hypertensives.

  3. Effect of dietary cholesterol and/or omega 3 fatty acids on lipid composition and delta 5-desaturase activity of rat liver microsomes.

  4. Omega-3 fatty acids in health and disease and in growth and development.

  5. Summary of the NATO advanced research workshop on dietary omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids: biological effects and nutritional essentiality.

  6. Long-term effect of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in active rheumatoid arthritis

  7. Omega-3 fatty acids in rheumatoid arthritis: an overview

  8. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Meta-analysis

  9. Clinical studies of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in patients who have rheumatoid arthritis.

  10. Omega − 3 fatty acid and ADHD: Blood level analysis and meta-analytic extension of supplementation trials

  11. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation for the Treatment of Children With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptomatology: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

  12. Polyunsaturated fatty acids, inflammation, and immunity

  13. Immunomodulation by omega-3 fatty acids

  14. Omega-3 fatty acids and inflammation

  15. Omega-3 Fatty Acids Prevent Inflammation and Metabolic Disorder through Inhibition of NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation

  16. Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Inflammation and Autoimmune Diseases

  17. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Essential Fatty Acid Status as a Predictor of Future Suicide Risk

  18. Omega-3 supplementation lowers inflammation and anxiety in medical students: A randomized controlled trial

  19. Omega-3 fatty acids and major depression: A primer for the mental health professional

  20. Influence of arginine, omega-3 fatty acids and nucleotide-supplemented enteral support on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiple organ failure in patients after severe trauma

  21. Effects of Omega‐3 Fatty Acids on Lipids and Glycemic Control in Type II Diabetes and the Metabolic Syndrome and on Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Renal Disease, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, and Osteoporosis: Summary

  22. N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in coronary heart disease: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

  23. Fish consumption, omega-3 fatty acids and risk of heart failure: A meta-analysis

  24. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Physical Performance Optimization

  25. Hempseed as a nutritional resource: An overview

  26. The Composition of Hemp Seed Oil and Its Potential as an Important Source of Nutrition

  27. Characteristics of hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) seed oil

  28. Nutritional and Medicinal Guide to Hemp Seed

  29. The Importance of the Omega-6/Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ratio in Cardiovascular Disease and Other Chronic Diseases

  30. Occurrence of “omega-3” stearidonic acid (cis-6,9,12,15-octadecatetraenoic acid) in hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) seed

  31. Gamma Linolenic Acid: An Antiinflammatory Omega-6 Fatty Acid

  32. The Use of an Inflammation-Modulating Diet in Patients With Acute Lung Injury or Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis of Outcome Data

  33. Importance of n−3 fatty acids in health and disease

  34. Omega-3 Fatty Acids: An Essential Contribution

  35. Essential fatty acids, DHA and human brain

  36. Health effects of trans fatty acids.

  37. Effects of Different Forms of Dietary Hydrogenated Fats on Serum Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels

  38. First International Symposium on Trans Fatty Acids and Health, Rungstedgaard, Rungsted Kyst, Denmark

  39. 6 Graphs That Show Why The “War” on Fat Was a Huge Mistake

  40. The Case for Eating Butter Just Got Stronger

  41. Free Radical-Scavenging Properties of Olive Oil Polyphenols

  42. Omega-6 Fatty Acids and Risk for Cardiovascular Disease

  43. Effects of dietary oleic, linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids on blood pressure, serum lipids, lipoproteins and the formation of eicosanoid precursors in patients with mild essential hypertension.

  44. Mediterranean alpha-linolenic acid-rich diet in secondary prevention of coronary heart disease

  45. Alpha-Linolenic Acid: A Gift From the Land?

  46. α-Linolenic acid supplementation and conversion to n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in humans

  47. Omega-6 Fatty Acid

  48. Alpha-linolenic acid

  49. Omega-3 Fatty Acid

  50. Omega-3 Fatty Acids for Neuropathic Pain: Case Series

  51. Lungershausen Yvonne K.; Abbey, Mavis; Nestel, Paul J.; Howe, Peter R.C. Reduction of blood pressure and plasma triglycerides by omega-3 fatty acids in treated hypertensives. Journal of Hypertension: September 1994
  52. Robinson LE, Mazurak VC (2013). “n−3 Polyunsaturated fatty acids: Relationship to inflammation in health adults and adults exhibiting features of metabolic syndrome”. Lipids. 48 (4): 319–32.
  53. Backes, J., Anzalone, D., Hilleman, D., & Catini, J. (2016). The clinical relevance of omega-3 fatty acids in the management of hypertriglyceridemia. Lipids in Health and Disease, 15, 118.

We advise that you search Google for the scientific studies on the health benefits of not just hemp seed oil, but also omega fatty acids, which are found in hemp seed oil. There are many fascinating health benefits currently being investigated, but these health effects have yet to be approved for use in marketing or packaging of food products in New Zealand and Australia.
If you have further questions, please email [email protected] or click the green bubble in the bottom-right corner.